Columbus Audubon

Audubon in Central Ohio since 1913

Rusty Blackbirds: Going, Going, Hopefully Not Gone

Rusty BlackbirdRusty BlackbirdRusty Blackbirds, considered common to abundant one-hundred years ago, have declined precipitously during the last four decades. Estimates of decline vary between 85 percent, based on Christmas Bird Counts, and 97 percent, based on Breeding Bird Survey results along the southern margin of the Rusty's breeding range. The losses are staggering. Uncertainty is high, Rusty Blackbirds are difficult to find and count during winter. Christmas Bird Counts find small numbers. Breeding Bird Surveys barely penetrate their northern breeding range. But everyone agrees that the formerly abundant Rusty Blackbird is now uncommon to rare almost everywhere it is found, and the species is in trouble.

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Hoover Happenings: Fall 2010

Over the years I have recorded 254 bird species at Hoover Reservoir. Others have recorded additional species. Jim McCormac rightfully lists Hoover Reservoir as one of the top birding locations in Ohio in his book Birds of Ohio. The Audubon Society has identified the area at the north end of Hoover Reservoir as an Important Birding Area (IBA).

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Delaware County's Ospreys in 2010

OspreyOspreyDick Tuttle reports on the 2010 nesting season for Ospreys in Delaware County.  The success story continues!

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Invasive species: Zebra Mussel (Dreissena polymorpha)

Zebra MusselZebra MusselWe have been featuring invasive species in the Song Sparrow for over five years without mention of the Zebra Mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) which arguably could be the poster child for invasives in Ohio, at least to capturing public attention.

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Copper Thieves Create a Close Call For Kestrels

What's this:  rural thievery creates a hazard for nesting American Kestrels?  DIck Tuttle tells what could have been a hair-raising tale (literally).  Fortunately, there's a happy ending for the birds!

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